Knives & swords

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The Enforcer Tactical Gauntlet And Throwing Knives- Stainless Steel Blades, PU And Nylon Canvas Arm Sheath - Length 13 1/2”

The Enforcer Tactical Gauntlet And Throw...

The knives of the enforcer series are specially de...

$$79.00 Add To Cart
US 1942 COMBAT FIGHTING KNIFE AND SWORD SET - STAINLESS STEEL BLADES, NON-REFLECTIVE FINISH, STACKED LEATHER HANDLES, SHEATHS

US 1942 COMBAT FIGHTING KNIFE AND SWORD ...

firing at stationary targets...

$$49.00 Add To Cart
M48 TSUNAMI DAGGER WITH VORTEC SHEATH - 2CR13 STAINLESS STEEL BLADE, INJECTION-MOLDED NYLON FIBER HANDLE - LENGTH 12 1/4”

M48 TSUNAMI DAGGER WITH VORTEC SHEATH - ...

fighting and stilt attack...

$$69.00 Add To Cart
RED WARRIOR COLLECTOR SET - INCLUDES A VARIETY OF KNIVES

RED WARRIOR COLLECTOR SET - INCLUDES A V...

Combat...

$$89.00 Add To Cart
Silver Road Warrior Folding Trench Knife - 3Cr13 Stainless Steel Blade, Metal And ABS Handle

Silver Road Warrior Folding Trench Knife...

It’s dangerous out there on the open road but wh...

$$17.00 Add To Cart
Fire And Ice Battle Set - Stainless Steel Blades, TPE Karambit Handle, Cord-Wrapped Sword Handles

Fire And Ice Battle Set - Stainless Stee...

Fierce in design and formidable in construction, t...

$$99.00 Add To Cart
Professional Stainless Steel Chain Whip

Professional Stainless Steel Chain Whip...

Long range fighting and grabbing...

$$49.00 Add To Cart
MINI GHOST SERIES GREY DOUBLE EDGE OTF KNIFE - STAINLESS STEEL BLADE, METAL ALLOY HANDLE

MINI GHOST SERIES GREY DOUBLE EDGE OTF K...

Defensive pocket knife...

$$65.00 Add To Cart
SECURE PRO PRACTICE PADLOCK AND 15-PIECE LOCK PICK SET

SECURE PRO PRACTICE PADLOCK AND 15-PIECE...

Learn or develop pin lock picking skills...

$$19.00 Add To Cart
RIDGE RUNNER BRIMSTONE CANYON MACHETE / FIXED BLADE KNIFE WITH NYLON SHEATH

RIDGE RUNNER BRIMSTONE CANYON MACHETE / ...

Protection...

$$18.00 Add To Cart
EXPENDABLES KUNAI THREE-PIECE THROWING KNIFE SET

EXPENDABLES KUNAI THREE-PIECE THROWING K...

Distant Attack...

$$39.00 Add To Cart
HIBBEN HELLFYRE DOUBLE SHADOW KNIFE WITH SHEATH - DAMASCUS STEEL BLADE, WIRE-WRAPPED HANDLE

HIBBEN HELLFYRE DOUBLE SHADOW KNIFE WITH...

This is a Gil Hibben masterpiece that you absolute...

$$174.00 Add To Cart
AMERICAN FLAG BOWIE AND POCKET KNIFE SET - STAINLESS STEEL BLADES, ALUMINUM HANDLES

AMERICAN FLAG BOWIE AND POCKET KNIFE SET...

This set is just about as patriotic as you can get...

$$35.00 Add To Cart
BUSHMASTER BUTCHER BOWIE KNIFE AND SHEATH - 1095 HIGH CARBON STEEL BLADE

BUSHMASTER BUTCHER BOWIE KNIFE AND SHEAT...

The Butcher Bowie is more than capable of handling...

$$49.00 Add To Cart
COMBAT COMMANDER SUB COMMANDER NEXT GENERATION BOOT KNIFE

COMBAT COMMANDER SUB COMMANDER NEXT GENE...

The next generation in discreet self-defense, this...

$$40.00 Add To Cart
GIL HIBBEN

GIL HIBBEN "EXPENDABLES 2" TOOTHPICK KNI...

Mirror polished 3Cr13 stainless steel blade...

$$89.00 Add To Cart

Category Description

Description A sword is an edged, bladed weapon intended for manual cutting or thrusting. Its blade, longer than a knife or dagger, is attached to a hilt and can be straight or curved. A thrusting sword tends to have a straighter blade with a pointed tip. A slashing sword is more likely to be curved and to have a sharpened cutting edge on one or both sides of the blade. Many swords are designed for both thrusting and slashing. The precise definition of a sword varies by historical epoch and geographic region. Historically, the sword developed in the Bronze Age, evolving from the dagger; the earliest specimens date to about 1600 BC. The later Iron Age sword remained fairly short and without a crossguard. The spatha, as it developed in the Late Roman army, became the predecessor of the European sword of the Middle Ages, at first adopted as the Migration Period sword, and only in the High Middle Ages, developed into the classical arming sword with crossguard. The word sword continues the Old English, sweord.[1] The use of a sword is known as swordsmanship or, in a modern context, as fencing. In the Early Modern period, western sword design diverged into roughly two forms, the thrusting swords and the sabers. Thrusting swords such as the rapier and eventually the smallsword were designed to impale their targets quickly and inflict deep stab wounds. Their long and straight yet light and well balanced design made them highly maneuverable and deadly in a duel but fairly ineffective when used in a slashing or chopping motion. A well aimed lunge and thrust could end a fight in seconds with just the sword's point, leading to the development of a fighting style which closely resembles modern fencing. The sabre and similar blades such as the cutlass were built more heavily and were more typically used in warfare. Built for slashing and chopping at multiple enemies, often from horseback, the saber's long curved blade and slightly forward weight balance gave it a deadly character all its own on the battlefield. Most sabers also had sharp points and double-edged blades, making them capable of piercing soldier after soldier in a cavalry charge. Sabers continued to see battlefield use until the early 20th century. The US Navy kept tens of thousands of sturdy cutlasses in their armory well into World War II and many were issued to Marines in the Pacific as jungle machetes. Non-European weapons classified as swords include single-edged weapons such as the Middle Eastern scimitar, the Chinese dao and the related Japanese katana. The Chinese jin ? is an example of a non-European double-edged sword, like the European models derived from the double-edged Iron Age sword. Knife blades can be manufactured from a variety of materials, each of which has advantages and disadvantages. Carbon steel, an alloy of iron and carbon, can be very sharp. It holds its edge well, and remains easy to sharpen, but is vulnerable to rust and stains. Stainless steel is an alloy of iron, chromium, possibly nickel, and molybdenum, with only a small amount of carbon. It is not able to take quite as sharp an edge as carbon steel, but is highly resistant to corrosion. High carbon stainless steel is stainless steel with a higher amount of carbon, intended to incorporate the better attributes of carbon steel and stainless steel. High carbon stainless steel blades do not discolor or stain, and maintain a sharp edge. Laminated blades use multiple metals to create a layered sandwich, combining the attributes of both. For example, a harder, more brittle steel may be sandwiched between an outer layer of softer, tougher, stainless steel to reduce vulnerability to corrosion. In this case, however, the part most affected by corrosion, the edge, is still vulnerable. Damascus steel is a form of pattern welding with similarities to laminate construction. Layers of different steel types are welded together, but then the stock is manipulated to create patterns in the steel.[5] Titanium is a metal that has a better strength-to-weight ratio, is more wear resistant, and more flexible than steel. Although less hard and unable to take as sharp an edge, carbides in the titanium alloy allow them to be heat-treated to a sufficient hardness. Ceramic blades are hard, brittle, and lightweight: they may maintain a sharp edge for years with no maintenance at all, but are as fragile as glass and will break if dropped on a hard surface. They are immune to common corrosion, and can only be sharpened on silicon carbide sandpaper and some grinding wheels. Plastic blades are not especially sharp and typically serrated. They are often disposable. Knife blades have different profiles Steel blades are commonly shaped by forging or stock removal. Forged blades are made by heating a single piece of steel, then shaping the metal while hot using a hammer or press. Stock removal blades are shaped by grinding and removing metal. With both methods, after shaping, the steel must be heat treated. This involves heating the steel above its critical point, then quenching the blade to harden it. After hardening, the blade is tempered to remove stresses and make the blade tougher. Mass manufactured kitchen cutlery uses both the forging and stock removal processes.[6] Forging tends to be reserved for manufacturers' more expensive product lines, and can often be distinguished from stock removal product lines by the presence of an integral bolster, though integral bolsters can be crafted through either shaping method. Knives are sharpened in various ways. Flat ground blades have a profile that tapers from the thick spine to the sharp edge in a straight or convex line. Seen in cross section, the blade would form a long, thin triangle, or where the taper does not extend to the back of the blade, a long thin rectangle with one peaked side. Hollow ground blades have concave, beveled edges. The resulting blade has a thinner edge, so it may have better cutting ability for shallow cuts, but it is lighter and less durable than flat ground blades and will tend to bind in deep cuts.[citation needed] Serrated blade knives have a wavy, scalloped or saw-like blade. Serrated blades are more well suited for tasks that require aggressive 'sawing' motions, whereas plain edge blades are better suited for tasks that require push-through cuts (e.g., shaving, chopping, slicing). Many knives have holes in the blade for various uses. Holes are commonly drilled in blades to reduce friction while cutting, increase single-handed usability of pocket knives, and, for butchers' knives, allow hanging out of the way when not in use.